Reasons to Own a Gun Safe

Owning a gun is a serious responsibility and it’s important that you properly secure your firearms. A gun safe is one way you can accomplish this. Safes keep your weapons away from unauthorized users. Depending on the type of safe you buy, it may also protect them from fire or water damage. Some safes even have biometric controls for quicker access if you need your weapon in an emergency.

Here are some of the benefits of owning a gun safe:

Protect Your Children

If you have children, especially young children, owning a gun safe is a good idea. Children are curious and restricting a child’s access to firearms in your home can help prevent tragedy. Keeping your guns securely stored allows you to teach your child the importance of gun safety and gives you peace of mind that they will not accidentally gain access to your weapons.

Protect Yourself Legally

Imagine that someone broke into your home without causing damage, like going through an unlocked window or using a credit card to open a locked door. If they were to steal your gun and there is no physical damage caused during the break-in, it can be difficult to prove that your gun was stolen. If your firearm is used for criminal activity and you cannot prove that it was stolen, then you could have legal action brought up against you. Even if you can prove that the gun was stolen, if it was not in a secure location, you could still have legal exposure.

This is also true if someone who you’ve invited into your home gains access to your gun and has an accident with it, such as a neighbor or babysitter. By securely storing guns in a safe, you can show that you took measures to prevent access. This can help you legally defend yourself if someone uses your gun without authorization.

Homeowners Insurance Coverage

Certain homeowners insurance companies offer discounts if you own a gun safe. In some cases, an insurance company will not offer you full coverage for the value of your guns unless they are stored securely. Making an insurance claim is stressful. Most insurance companies try to pay you the lowest amount possible or get out of paying altogether. Showing you were taking steps to protect your valuables, including your guns, can make it easier and faster to get reimbursed if your guns were damaged or stolen. Be sure to check with your insurance company before you buy a safe as many have different requirements.

Store Valuables

Gun safes are not just for guns. Because gun safes are frequently larger, bolted to the ground, and often resistant to water and fire, they can be a great place to store other valuables. Items such as jewelry, coins, and even important documents can be secured in a safe along with your firearms.

Gun Safes At The Hub

There are many styles and types of gun safes. Electronic lock, wheel and pin combination, key lock, and biometric gun safes are some of the more common types. If you are not sure what kind is best for you, or you want more information, our gun experts are always happy to answer your questions. You can purchase gun safes at either of our locations or from our online store.

Visit us online or in store to purchase a gun safe.

Your Guide to AR-15 Parts

The AR-15 semi-automatic rifle was first designed by Armalite in 1956. It was then sold to Colt in 1959, who sold it as a civilian counterpart to the military M4. Once Colt’s patent expired in 1977, a variety of other companies began to construct AR-15-style rifles. Today, firearms using this model are made by many different manufacturers. AR-15s are also a common choice for those who enjoy assembling their own guns. Building an AR-15 is easier than many would assume and it is a great way to create a fully-customized weapon.

In order to build your own AR-15, you will need to understand the basic parts of this rifle. 

AR-15 Lower Receiver

The lower receiver is the part of the rifle that includes the fire control group, magazine well, and pistol grip. It can be forged (hammered into shape) or billet (milled into shape). Forged receivers are stronger, whereas billet receivers are lighter but slightly weaker.

The lower receiver is the only AR-15 part that is legally considered a firearm. This means that it has a serial number and specific regulations govern its purchase. Some builders prefer to purchase an 80% lower receiver which is not legally considered a firearm. This is an unfinished version of the part and it’s not able to fire without milling. It requires more work to finish an 80% lower receiver, but this is more customizable and may involve fewer fees than purchasing a full lower receiver.

You will also need to buy lower receiver parts, which include: a trigger assembly, trigger guard, magazine catch/release, bolt catch/release, safety selector switch, grip, takedown pins, receiver extension (buffer tube), buffer and spring, and buttstock. You can purchase these in a kit or separately.

Upper Receiver

The AR-15 upper receiver houses and protects the components on the top of your rifle. It can be flat top or carry handle. A flat top receiver has a Picatinny railing at the top, whereas a carry handle receiver has a rear sight assembly in this location. This part can be forged, billet, or cast. Cast is the lightest option, but it is also the weakest. You can purchase a stripped upper, which contains only the upper receiver and will require more parts to complete. If you prefer, you can purchase a complete upper, which only needs to be attached to a lower receiver. Parts in the upper receiver group that you will need to attach to a stripped upper include the charging handle, barrel, handguard, and bolt carrier group.

Gas System

Guns fire by using high-pressure gas generated through a gunpowder explosion to propel a bullet. Some of the pressure also ejects the spent cartridge and brings a new one into the chamber. AR-15 rifles use a direct impingement system, meaning that a “gas port” on the chamber vents hot gas into a tube and brings it back to the receiver to automatically cycle the next round. When you build your own AR-15, you will choose the length of the gas block, which is the length between the gas port and the receiver. You should choose the gas system length based on the length of your barrel. From shortest to longest, your options are carbine, mid-length, and rifle.

Furniture and Accessories

Once the functional components of your AR-15 are in place, you will want to add furniture and accessories. Furniture refers to the parts of your gun that you hold/support and includes the stock, grip, and handguard. You will want to pick these based on what feels best for you. Accessories are any other parts to enhance your gun such as scopes or lights.

The Hub, Your Arizona Gun Store

We Can Help You Build Your New AR-15

At The Hub, we specialize in AR-15-style rifles. We carry many versions of these firearms at our Tucson and Lakeside locations and online. We are also happy to help you if you wish to build your own. Our store carries the different AR-15 parts you will need and if we don’t have what you need in stock, we can help you locate it.

Visit The Hub online or in store for AR-15 rifles and parts.

Understanding Arizona CCW Reciprocity

Concealed carry weapon (CCW) reciprocity is a practice across the United States that allows for a permit from one state to be accepted in another. This gives you the ability to conceal carry your firearm in states other than the one where your permit was issued. Arizona CCW reciprocity can help protect your rights while you are in another state with your firearm. Since this does not apply to all states, it is important to check the legal requirements for states you will be traveling to or through.

Arizona is one of the few states that allows you to carry a weapon (concealed carry or open carry) without a permit, provided you meet all legal requirements. However, it still benefits you to obtain a CCW. Arizona CCW reciprocity laws are one major reason for this. When in another state that requires a concealed carry permit, simply being an Arizona resident is not enough to give you the right to carry a concealed handgun or other firearms. No permit means no right to carry your weapon.

Some of the situations where CCW reciprocity could impact you: 

Traveling with a Concealed Weapon

Your firearm can be an important tool for self-defense. When you are traveling away from home, particularly to a place you have never been to before, you may feel uncomfortable and question your safety. In these cases, you might want to have a concealed weapon. You should also consider whether or not you have a firearm in your car. If you are driving across multiple states, you need to consider what the laws are regarding concealed carry in vehicles. Having a CCW permit in Arizona can give you peace of mind in the states that have reciprocity. However, you still need to check local restrictions.

Moving With a Firearm

Moving involves packing up all of your belongings and relocating. In many cases, your new home will be in a different state. The process of moving can be very stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is how to transport your gun(s) and if you will need to get a concealed carry permit in your new state. Arizona CCW reciprocity may cover your new home or any states you pass through during your move. You should check specific regulations for each state you pass through and for the area you will live in so you don’t break any laws that differ from those in Arizona. You may also need to obtain a resident permit in your new state at some point in the future, but having an Arizona CCW can give you more time so you don’t have to worry.

States with Arizona CCW Reciprocity

The following states honor Arizona CCW permits:

  • Alabama
  • Colorado
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Iowa
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Louisiana
  • Montana
  • Michigan
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Nevada
  • New Mexico
  • Nebraska
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

States similar to Arizona that have “permitless carry,” also called constitutional carry, are:

  • Alaska
  • Arkansas
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Maine
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • New Hampshire
  • South Dakota
  • Vermont
  • West Virginia

If you travel to any of the above states, Arizona CCW reciprocity is valid and you should be able to conceal carry your weapon. However, it is important that you check the local laws for each state where you will possess your weapon. The restrictions on concealed carry can vary, even if there is reciprocity.

The Hub Can Help You Understand Arizona CCW Reciprocity

The Hub offers CCW classes so you can earn your permit. This gives you many benefits, including reciprocity in other states. During our classes, we go over important topics related to concealed carry. This includes reciprocity and we are happy to answer any questions you have during our courses.

Contact us today to reserve a spot in one of The Hub’s Arizona CCW classes.