How Night Vision for Scopes Works

Scopes are an important firearm accessory for hunters and additional features can help you get the most benefit out of your optics. Night vision for scopes is one example. This technology allows you to see more clearly in low light conditions and is essential for night hunting.

Here is how night vision works:

Traditional Optoelectronic Image Enhancement

Older scopes use optoelectronic image enhancement and the technology in newer night vision scopes is also based on this traditional method.

The way it works is that light enters the scope through the objective lens. This captures both visible light and infrared light (which you cannot see with the naked eye). The light then enters an image-intensifier tube, which creates a vacuum using electricity. The first part of the image-intensifier tube converts photons (particles of light) into electrons (small charged particles). These then move to the microchannel plate (MCP). This is a glass disk with a large number of tiny holes. When the electrons pass through these holes, they multiply and increase the electric signal. The electrons then hit a phosphor-coated screen that lights up where the electrons hit it. This creates a green image that you can view through the scope’s ocular lens.

The image is green because when the photons are converted into electrons, it is impossible to preserve the color. Manufacturers of night vision scopes chose to make the image green instead of another color or black and white because our eyes are more sensitive to green light. Green images are also easier to look at for long periods of time without straining your eyes.

Digital Night Vision Scopes

Traditional night vision scopes can be heavy and bulky. Although they use similar principles to optoelectronic image enhancement, digital scopes use digitization instead of multiple lenses to amplify light. This allows them to be smaller and lighter.

Like with a traditional scope, light first enters a digital night vision scope through the objective lens. A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor, which is the same type of sensor a digital camera uses, converts the light into a digital signal. The scope then magnifies this image several times and enhances it electronically. Finally, the image is transported to a screen in the scope for viewing. Some models also let you connect, store, or stream the video for remote viewing using other devices.

Choosing the Right Night Vision Scope

If you want to hunt at night, the proper scope is essential. However, it can be difficult to find the best option for you when there are so many different varieties available. The same principles that help you choose any scope apply when choosing a scope with night vision. You should think about how you will actually use your optics and make sure that using the scope feels natural.

Night Vision Scopes at The Hub

You can browse our selection of night vision optics online or in either of our two physical Arizona gun stores. Our gun experts can help you determine which scopes fit your needs and we are happy to answer any questions you may have.

Visit The Hub today to purchase a night vision scope.

What is Grip Stippling?

There are many modifications that you can make to your firearm to customize the weapon for your needs. One example is grip stippling, which is the process of melting tiny holes into the polymer frame of your handgun. This creates more traction and allows for a more secure grip. Stippling used to be more common for competition firearms, but more and more gun owners are realizing its benefits.

More information about firearm stippling:

What to Know About Grip Stippling

If you are considering stippling your gun, you should be aware of the benefits and drawbacks.

Benefits

The major benefit of grip stippling is the improved traction it creates. The textured surface is easier to hold. In particular, this is useful if there is increased moisture due to weather conditions, natural oils from your skin, or sweaty palms. If you are using your gun for home defense, stippling can be helpful to make sure you can keep a firm grip on your firearm even in a stressful situation. Stippling also allows for better recoil management and can improve accuracy. This makes it a common modification for competitive shooters.

Potential Drawbacks

Before you stipple your firearm, you should make sure it is the best option for your needs. We recommend only stippling a gun if you plan to keep it, as this modification can reduce the resale value of your weapon. Stippling can also void your warranty depending on the manufacturer, so make sure your gun is working as it should before you make this alteration. If you don’t want to stipple your gun but still want a more textured grip, there are less permanent options such as TALON Grips.

How to Stipple Your Handgun

DIY Grip Stippling

It is possible to stipple your handgun’s grip at home, although you should be extremely careful as melting too deep can damage your firearm. Attention to detail is essential so you do not ruin the appearance of the gun or even break it completely.

Make sure to work in a well-ventilated area to avoid inhaling any fumes. To stipple your gun you will need a soldering iron. If you also want to remove finger grooves from the grip, you will need a Dremel tool. After using the Dremel to make any modifications you would like, you can press the soldering iron into the polymer to create a small hole. Doing this softly results in smaller holes whereas pressing down longer creates a deeper impression.

Professional Stippling

If you don’t want to risk damaging your firearm or go through the hassle of stippling your gun, a professional stipple job can create a more aesthetically-pleasing grip while reducing the risk of damage.

Stippling at The Hub

If you are interested in a stippled grip, The Hub offers packages as well as other options to customize your weapon. If you prefer, you can also purchase TALON Grips or other accessories that add texture without permanently modifying your firearm.

To learn more about grip stippling, contact us today.