Types of Rifle Scopes

Choosing a firearm is an important decision, but the accessories you use with your gun can make a big difference. Optics, such as rifle scopes, can help you shoot more accurately. There are many options to choose from and it can be overwhelming to consider all the choices. This is especially true if you are a first-time gun owner. At The Hub, it is our goal to help you find the best firearms and accessories. Whether you have something specific in mind or need some guidance, our experts are happy to assist you.

Here are some options for rifle scopes: 

Magnification

Magnification is the degree to which a scope makes targets appear larger. The notation for this is fairly straightforward: a 3X scope makes what you are looking at three times larger, a 9X variety will make it nine times larger, et cetera.

The amount of magnification you need depends on how you plan to use your rifle. You need to make sure that you can see your intended target clearly. Too little magnification can make it difficult to determine where you are shooting and too much can prevent you from seeing everything around the target. Between 1X and 4X works well for target shooting up to 100 yards, small game, or home defense. 5X to 8X are suited for large game hunting, target shooting up to 200 yards, or hunting in an enclosed landscape such as the mountains or forest. Finally, scopes between 9X and 12X are best for target shooting beyond 200 yards or hunting in an open landscape like the desert or a field.

Fixed vs. Variable Magnification Scopes

Some rifle scopes are fixed, meaning they only have one possible magnification setting. Others are variable magnification and you can set a different level depending on your needs. You will see this written as a range, e.g. 3-6X for a scope that can be 3X, 4X, 5X, or 6X.

The benefit of a fixed scope is that you can aim and shoot more quickly. These also tend to be less expensive. However, you can only shoot from one specific range, so it may not be the best choice if you know you will need to change magnification. In general, you should choose a variable scope if you know you will be hunting from a variety of distances. A fixed scope is usually suitable for home defense.

Objective Lens Diameter

The objective lens is the portion at the end of the scope. Its diameter is listed in millimeters (mm). The bigger the diameter, the clearer and brighter the image will be. However, a bigger objective lens also makes the scope heavier and can reflect sunlight and give away your position if you are hunting.

An objective lens under 28 mm is best if your firearm has little recoil, you are hunting at a closer range, or you are using a lower magnification. An objective lens between 30 and 44 mm is suited if your gun has more recoil, you are hunting in low light conditions, or you are using a higher magnification. You should consider a lens over 50 mm if you are using a higher magnification scope in low light or if you are hunting at an extremely long range.

Scope Reticles

The reticle is the crosshairs you see when looking through a scope. There are three common types and each one has different benefits. We recommend trying them out and choosing the one that works best for you. The most important thing is that shooting and aiming should feel natural.

Duplex scope crosshairs

Duplex

This is the default variety for reticles and is the best choice if you are new to scopes. It works well for hunting and target shooting.

A mil-dot scope reticle

Mil-Dot

This type of crosshairs estimates a target’s distance. It is mainly used by the military, law enforcement, and security. However, it may be helpful for hunting purposes if you are shooting from a long distance.

A BDC reticle

BDC

A ballistic drop compensating (BDC) reticle uses lines or dots to mark the expected drop of a bullet at different ranges. This is an especially good choice for long-distance shooters, although once you learn how to use it, it can be beneficial for all purposes.

Choosing the Right Scope

These are just a few of the different choices you can make when choosing a scope and there are also additional features like night vision, strobe lights, and more. We carry a wide variety of options and can help you find the right scope for you.

For help choosing a scope, visit either of our Arizona gun stores or contact us for more information.

What You Need to Know About the NFA

The National Firearms Act (NFA) was enacted in 1934. This was the first piece of federal gun control legislation in the United States. During this time the nation was in the middle of the Great Depression. Newspapers figured out that readers were weary of stories about the economy and wanted a distraction. There was a rise in stories about gangsters, bank robbers, and bootleggers. This popularized individuals like Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger.

Journalists shared these stories and the rise of images, both still and moving, gave the public with the diversion they were looking for. However, the economic hardships and incidents like the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, strings of bank robberies, and police shootouts also fueled public outrage against uncontrolled gun ownership. This prompted the federal government to change gun laws.

What is the NFA?

To satisfy public outcry towards violent offenses and to reassure the general public, Congress passed the NFA. This legislation put a $200 excise tax on certain types of firearms and firearm accessories. It also required registration and other paperwork. In 1934, this excise tax was outrageous, and very few average citizens could afford it. While the act did not outright ban gun ownership, it did apply stringent rules to owning certain classes of weapons as well as regulating and taxing manufacturers and importers. These classes are machine guns, short-barreled rifles, short-barreled shotguns, silencers/suppressors, destructive devices, and a broad category for “any other weapon.”

Machine Guns

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) defines machine guns as firearms that fire more than one round per pull of the trigger. This definition includes burst fire weapons and any device that can convert a semi-automatic gun to fully-automatic. Some semi-automatic open-bolt weapons are also regulated under this rule if they were produced after 1982.

Short-Barreled Rifles

This part of the legislation regulates rifles that have barrels shorter than 16 inches. A rifle must fire a projectile through a rifled barrel and also use a stock. This legislation does not mention any other configuration besides barrel length and a stock, so it is possible to own rifle caliber pistols.

Short-Barreled Shotguns

Instead of having a rifled barrel, shotguns have a smooth bore, a stock, and fire shot. In the United States, shotguns must have a barrel at least 18 inches in length. Anything less is a short-barreled shotgun. Some shotguns are also destructive devices. Examples include the Street Sweeper and SPAS-12.

Silencers

Silencers, also called suppressors, are treated as NFA-controlled firearms even though they are not actual guns. This definition includes any device that reduces the explosive noise of a gun and can be readily attached to it.

Destructive Devices

Destructive devices (DDs) are a broad category that includes any weapon with a bore over .50 inches, unless it has a generally recognized sporting purpose. DDs also include explosives, mortars, missiles, poison gases, grenade launchers, and other destructive elements. If a shotgun has no sporting purpose, then it can be a DD.

Any Other Weapon

Any other weapon is another large category of all sorts of interesting weaponry. This includes 12-gauge firearms with a length of less than 26 inches, cane guns, some pen guns and disguised firearms, and guns with forward grips.

How does the NFA apply to you?

The NFA still impacts gun owners today. The $200 tax stamp and transfer taxes still apply as does the burdensome paperwork and regulations. This law was also modified in 1986 under the Hughes Amendment of the Firearm Owners Protection Act. This amendment made it so no more machine guns could be added to the registry. It is very important that before you purchase an NFA-controlled item, you know your state’s laws. Some states regulate or outright prohibit NFA items.

The NFA and The Hub

Let The Hub help you with what you need to know about the NFA. Our experienced staff specializes in NFA-controlled items. We carry a wide variety of guns, parts, and accessories that range from affordable guns for first-time owners to high-end, hard-to-find items for seasoned enthusiasts.

If you have further questions about the NFA or any other firearms, contact us today.

Choosing a Gun for Home Defense

Although you may not want to think about the worst-case scenario, it is important to be prepared in the event you need to protect yourself and your family. Choosing a gun for home defense can be difficult, especially if you have not shopped for firearms before. At The Hub, our experts are happy to help you find what you are looking for and answer any questions you may have.

Here are some things to consider:

The Type of Gun

There are many different types of guns and in most cases, which you choose usually has more to do with personal preferences than any one being the “best” choice. Each firearm has its benefits. Some people prefer shotguns because they have more firepower. Others choose handguns since they are easier to handle while moving and can be fired with one hand if necessary. Rifles are also preferred by many because of their larger magazine capacity and increased range. If you are not sure which is right for you, you may want to try firing each type to see what feels more natural and is easier for you to manage. Many people buy one of each so they have the perfect weapon for any situation, so this is also an option.

Caliber

Once you decide which type of gun you would like, you will have different options for the caliber. This is the size of the barrel and the ammunition (ammo) that the weapon fires. As a general rule, the greater the caliber, the more stopping power the firearm has. However, this also increases the recoil, so if you are a less experienced shooter, a smaller caliber may be a good option to start with. In most cases, .380 Automatic Colt Pistol (ACP) ammo or larger is recommended for self-defense.

Your Environment

When buying a gun, it is also important to consider your specific environment and situation. There is no one-size-fits-all solution and the best way to make sure your new firearm is right for you is to imagine how you would use it in an emergency. You should be realistic and consider all the variables. For example, you will need to consider the possibility of shooting through walls if you live in an apartment. This may mean that a lower caliber weapon is a better choice. If you are in a rural area, you may need a rifle with a longer range. Beyond the actual gun you buy, you should have a plan in place in case you need it to defend yourself and your family. This can help you make more informed decisions about the firearm you purchase.

Firearm Training

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that getting a gun and forgetting about it is an effective way to prepare for an emergency. Training and practice are essential for multiple reasons. As a gun owner, you are responsible for anything that happens with your firearm. This means you should know how to assess a situation quickly to make decisions regarding when to fire. You also need to know how to shoot accurately and be aware of your entire environment to ensure you only hit the intended target.

Our MILO Range is an excellent tool for improving your tactical judgement with real-world scenarios, whereas our physical gun range allows you to practice actually firing your weapon. Taking a concealed carry weapon (CCW) class is another way to develop your skills and is helpful even if you plan to use your weapon primarily for home defense instead of concealed carry.

A Wide Selection of Guns to Fit Your Needs

At The Hub, we have a large variety of firearms for everything from home defense to hunting. Whether you are a first-time buyer or an avid collector, our experts can help you find what you need. We also carry accessories that are beneficial for safe self-defense including gun safes and concealed carry holsters.

To find a gun for home defense or another purpose, visit The Hub today online or in store.

The Steps for Gun Cleaning

Gun cleaning is important to ensure your firearm continues to function properly. Residue from firing can build up over time and could lead to a dangerous malfunction. Cleaning and maintaining your gun regularly gives you peace of mind knowing the firearm is safe.

Here are the steps for cleaning your firearm:

Gather Gun Cleaning Supplies

Depending on your preference, you can either purchase a complete cleaning kit or buy the supplies separately. There may also be some items beyond the basics that you find helpful and the more you clean your gun, the more you will realize what works best for you.

You will need the following: 

  • Gun oil/lubricant
  • Liquid cleaning solvent
  • Bore cleaner brush
  • Nylon cleaning brush
  • Cleaning rod 
  • Cotton swabs
  • Patches and a patch holder
  • Polishing cloths 

Choose a Safe Working Area

You should work in an area that has good ventilation and lighting. Since you will be using various chemicals for cleaning, this should not be anywhere that you eat. The products may also have a strong smell, so you should be aware of this when choosing a location to clean your gun. If you have an outdoor space or an open garage where you can work, this is ideal, but a large room with a nearby open window is also an option.

Unload Your Firearm

Remove all ammunition from the area that you are working in and then unload your gun. Check to make sure there is no round ready to fire, that the magazine is removed, and that the barrel is clear. Double checking that your weapon is unloaded before cleaning is an essential safety step.

Read Your Gun’s Owner’s Manual

The owner’s manual for your gun will give detailed instructions for cleaning. It is important that you follow recommendations for your specific model to stay safe and avoid damaging the firearm.

Disassemble the Weapon if Necessary

Your owner’s manual will tell you how much to take the gun apart during cleaning. In general, you will strip semi-automatic pistols or rifles into their basic components. These are the barrel, slide, guide rod, frame, and magazine. Revolvers and shotguns do not usually need to be taken apart and you will simply open the chamber for cleaning.

Clean and Lubricate the Bore

To clean the inside of the gun’s barrel (bore), attach a patch holder to your cleaning rod. You should then place the patch in the holder and soak it with your solvent. Run it through the barrel, starting at the back if possible. Always remove the patch after you run it through and wipe down the cleaning rod and patch holder. Then, attach the bore brush to the rod and run this through the barrel as well. This loosens any debris. Switch between patches and the brush until a patch comes through clean. After this, run one dry patch through to ensure it is completely clear.

After cleaning the bore, you should lubricate your firearm using your preferred gun oil. To do this, add a few drops of the oil to a patch and run this through the barrel. This should leave a light coating.

Clean and Lubricate the Action

Coat your gun brush with the cleaning solvent and clean every part of the action. Next, dry it off with a cloth. Finally, add a small amount of gun oil to the moving parts. Using too much can gum up the action, especially if you leave the gun in storage after cleaning, so do not use too much.

Polish the Rest of the Gun

Use a polishing cloth to clean the rest of the gun. This will remove fingerprints, debris, and will restore shine to the firearm to keep it looking its best.

How Often Should You Clean Your Gun?

It is best to clean your gun after every time you shoot it. Some people clean less frequently, but regular cleaning is a great way to ensure there is not too much carbon build-up. If you are going to store your firearm, you should make sure that it is cleaned at least once a year. During the gun cleaning process, check for rust or cracks and if you notice any damage, take the weapon to a gunsmith.

Everything You Need for Gun Ownership

The Hub is your one-stop gun shop and you can find firearms, parts, accessories, and equipment. You can buy cleaning supplies including kits and individual items from The Hub online or by visiting either of our Arizona gun stores. To hear some of our recommendations for the best gun cleaning products, you can check out Episode 266 of our Get on Target podcast.

Visit us today to purchase gun cleaning products and more.

AR-10 vs. AR-15

In the 1950s, the Fairchild Aircraft company created a subdivision known as Armalite. This company designed lightweight, semi-automatic rifles. Since Armalite was relatively small, they focused on prototyping designs and selling them to larger manufacturers. Two of their most popular models are the AR-10 and the AR-15, which they sold to Colt in 1959. Although the AR-15 is the more well-known of the two, the AR-10 is also an excellent firearm to add to your collection.

Learn more about the differences between these guns:

Similarities Between the AR-10 and AR-15

One of the main similarities between these two rifle models is that they were designed to be incredibly lightweight. This is achieved by using lighter metals (such as aluminum alloy) and high-tech plastics.

Both models also use a direct impingement gas operation system. This means that gas from when a cartridge explodes is directed into the bolt carrier. As a result, the action cycles and a new cartridge can be placed into the chamber for firing. This allows the gun to operate without a separate gas cylinder, piston, or operating rod.

In general, the two styles of rifle look similar and have similar functionality. In fact, many parts are interchangeable between the two.

AR-10

The AR-10 was a precursor to the AR-15, but this does not mean it is less advanced. AR-10 rifles have a longer barrel, weigh slightly more, and are larger as a whole. This is because they generally fire a larger caliber of cartridge. 7.62 NATO and .308 Winchester are common calibers for AR-10-style rifles. You may also see 6.5 Creedmoor and .260 Remington options.

Some great choices for AR-10s are:

AR-15

AR-15-style rifles are among the most popular firearms in the United States. Many gun enthusiasts like to build and customize their own AR-15-style rifles. The main difference between this design and the AR-10 is that the AR-15 is smaller, lighter, and has a shorter barrel. It also uses different calibers, generally .223 Remington or 5.56 NATO.

Some great choices for AR-15s are:

Which Rifle is Best?

Choosing between an AR-10 and AR-15 often comes down to personal preference. You may want to try out both designs, as well as trying a few different models of each, to determine which one is best for you. Both are excellent guns and the quality often depends on the manufacturer.

In general, AR-15s have less recoil since they are slightly lighter. Many experts recommend AR-15-style rifles for home defense or small game hunting. Since the AR-10 uses a larger caliber, it is ideal to use as a big game hunting rifle.

Buy AR-10s and AR-15s at The Hub

At The Hub, we have a large selection of guns, parts, and accessories. These include National Firearms Act (NFA) controlled weapons as well as a wide range of rifles, shotguns, and handguns. We are happy to help you find exactly what you are looking for and if we don’t have it in stock, we will find a way to get it for you.

Visit us online, in Lakeside, or in Tucson to purchase an AR-10, AR-15, or other firearm.

How Revolvers Work

Revolvers are one of the most popular types of guns for home defense due to their reliable and simple design. They were first invented in the 19th century to allow shooters to fire multiple times before reloading. These firearms work differently than a semi-automatic pistol or long gun, but it is relatively easy to learn how to use them.

How a revolver works and how to use it:

How a Gun Fires

The basic principle behind firearms is that they use a controlled explosion to propel a metal projectile (bullet) at a high speed. Although many people will use the term “bullet” to refer to the ammunition (ammo) they load into their weapon, the full object is the cartridge and the bullet is only the portion at the end that fires from the gun. The cartridge also includes gunpowder/propellant in the middle, which takes up about two-thirds of the volume. Finally, there is a small percussion cap or primer at the opposite end of the bullet. All of this is encased in metal.

When you pull the trigger of a gun, it activates a spring mechanism that hammers a firing pin into the primer. This ignites a small spark that in turn lights the powder, triggering an explosion. This generates gas which builds pressure that forces the bullet down the barrel of the gun very quickly, about 300 meters/second (1000 feet/second) for a standard handgun. The rest of the cartridge stays where it is and must be ejected, which happens manually or automatically depending on the gun.

How a Revolver Works

The barrel is the long metal part of the gun that the bullet travels down after the trigger is pulled. The chamber is where a cartridge is inserted before firing. In a semi-automatic gun, there is one chamber that remains stationary. Cartridges are automatically loaded into this chamber from a magazine. By contrast, a revolver has multiple chambers that rotate to line up with the barrel for firing.

Standard revolvers have six different chambers which are in a circle in the gun’s cylinder. This is the part that rotates and it can be swung out for reloading. In order to fire a bullet, a chamber must line up with the barrel. The firing mechanism is the same as with other types of guns: the hammer cocks then hits the primer and triggers an explosion to propel the bullet.

Single-Action Revolvers

In a traditional single-action revolver, the shooter must cock the hammer manually between each trigger pull. Someone usually performs this action with the thumb of their firing or supporting hand. This advances the cylinder to the next chamber and pulls the hammer back. The trigger pull then releases the hammer and fires the bullet.

Double-Action Revolvers

Whereas the trigger of a single-action revolver only does one thing (release the hammer), the trigger of a double-action revolver both cocks the hammer and releases it. There is no need to separately cock the hammer every time you wish to fire this type of revolver. This requires a longer trigger pull, which is less natural for many shooters but is relatively easy to do with practice.

Browse Our Selection of Revolvers

Revolvers have a classic design and they are familiar to many gun owners. You can browse our selection online or visit us at either of our Arizona gun stores. We are also happy to answer any questions you may have about the firearms we carry.

Visit The Hub today to see our revolvers and other weapons, parts, and accessories.

The Many Different Types of Guns

There are many types of guns. Most are split into two general categories, handguns and long guns. As a general rule, handguns use a smaller caliber ammunition than their larger counterparts and have a shorter barrel. Long guns fire larger caliber rounds from longer barrels and are meant to be fired from the shoulder.

Both of these two general categories can be broken down into subcategories:

Handguns

Handguns come in many shapes and sizes, with various options for what caliber ammunition they use. These firearms are good choices for home defense and range practice. The most basic types of handguns are revolvers and semi-automatics.

Revolvers

Revolvers are generally run by a cylinder. They are great for new firearm owners because they are more simple to operate and maintain than semi-automatic handguns. However, they hold fewer bullets and reloading can take longer.

How revolvers fire can be broken down into two categories: single-action and double-action. Single-action revolvers only fire when the shooter manually cocks the hammer. As the hammer moves back, it turns the cylinder that contains the ammunition, putting it into line to fire. You will need to repeat this every time you want to fire the weapon.

You can fire a double-action revolver either by cocking the hammer or by just pulling the trigger. Not cocking the hammer results in a longer trigger pull. If you want a shorter trigger pull, you can still cock the hammer manually. However, this may increase the firing time.

Semi-Automatic Pistols

Semi-automatic pistols are magazine fed. When you fire this type of handgun the gas released propels the slide back and forth, which ejects the old round and automatically puts a new round in. In order to fire the first round of a semi-automatic, you will have to load the weapon and pull the slide back to rack a round into the chamber. After this, the weapon will fire a single shot with every trigger pull for as long as it has ammunition. This handgun is quick loading and carries more bullets than a revolver. Some experts believe that the revolver has better functionality as the semi-automatic can jam when being fired, though this is rare.

Long Guns

Like handguns, long guns come in a large variety of sizes and calibers. How they function can vary greatly. A few of the more common long guns and rifles include lever-action and bolt-action rifles,  semi-automatic rifles, and shotguns.

Lever-Action and Bolt-Action Rifles

Lever-action and bolt-action rifles are often talked about together, but they are different in how they function. The essential differences are the way the bolt is operated and locks into position and the location of the bolt versus the location of the lever.

The bolt on a bolt-action firearm is commonly on the right-hand side of the handle. To operate the handle, the bolt is unlocked and pulled back, opening the breech. This action ejects any spent cartridge and cocks the firing pin. If available, a new cartridge is loaded into the chamber and the bolt is locked in place for firing.

The lever on a lever-action firearm is located near the trigger guard area and often includes the trigger guard itself. When the shooter works the lever, it loads fresh ammunition into the chamber of the barrel. Lever-action and bolt-action rifles have advantages and disadvantages and there is some debate over which is better. However, both types of rifles have remained popular for sporting use.

Semi-Automatic Rifles

Semi-automatic rifles are self-loading rifles. While they can vary greatly in form and functionality, they all have one thing in common. These types of guns uses gas or recoil energy to eject the spent shell and a new round is chambered from the magazine. This allows another bullet to fire when the shooter pulls the trigger again. Most also have rifled barrels, which means that there are grooves lengthwise across the inside of the barrel. When the bullet fires through the barrel, these grooves cause the bullet to spin, allowing it to travel at a greater velocity and enhancing accuracy.

These types of firearms are popular for use in sport shooting, hunting, and for self-defense.

Shotguns

Shotguns differ from rifles as they are uniquely able to fire shells containing pellets, shots, or slugs of different sizes and types. Unlike rifles, shotgun barrels are typically not rifled or grooved inside. There are two types of shotguns which differ in how they function. These are the pump-action shotgun and the semi-automatic shotgun.

Both of these use shotgun ammo, but the pump-action shotgun requires the user to move the slide backwards and forwards manually to load each shell. Semi-automatic shotguns use the force created by the previous shot to automatically eject the empty shell case and chamber the next round.

Do You Have Questions About Types of Guns?

If you have questions about different types of firearms or want to make sure we have what you are looking for, call our experts at The Hub. We are happy to help.

Visit The Hub today and browse the different types of guns and ammo that we offer.

The Basics of Calibers

The term “caliber” can refer to a gun barrel or to ammunition. It can be measured in inches or millimeters (mm). A gun’s caliber is the internal diameter of the barrel. When referring to ammo, it is the diameter of the bullet. To clarify the terminology, a cartridge is the entire unit that you load into your firearm, whereas the bullet only refers to the metal projectile that the gun fires. Calibers are important to consider when choosing a firearm and each one has its own pros and cons.

Bullet Calibers

The following list includes some of the most popular calibers for bullets and some information about each one. Although it does not cover every type of bullet, it is a good beginner’s guide to the most common calibers you will see when shopping for a firearm or ammo.

.22 LR

.22 Long Rifle (LR), commonly referred to as just “twenty-two,” is a good starting caliber if you have never fired a gun before. It is the most commonly sold ammo in the world. Since the bullets are relatively small, the recoil on a .22 LR firearm is less intense. They also make less noise when firing. Their smaller size does have an effect on their power. Most experts don’t consider them the best option for self-defense. This caliber works well for hunting small game.

.380 ACP, .38 Special, and .357 Magnum

.380 Automatic Colt Pistol (ACP) bullets actually have a diameter of 0.36 inches. This is the same as the .38 Special and .357 Magnum. The difference between the three is the length of the cartridge. The .380 ACP is the shortest and .357 Magnum is the longest. The .380 ACP is generally considered the smallest caliber that is reasonable for self-defense. .38 Special and .357 Magnum have more recoil than the .380 ACP. It is important to note that while the diameter is the same, you should not use any ammo in your gun that is not suggested in the owner’s manual and the differing lengths prevent these calibers from being interchangeable.

9mm

9mm has the same diameter as .380 ACP, .38 Special, and .357 Magnum. There are a few different types of 9mm rounds, but the most common is the 9mm Luger, which is used for pistols. 9mm is the standard caliber for most police forces around the world and it is a great choice for concealed carry.

.45 ACP

Many gun enthusiasts recommend .45 ACP rounds since the larger size gives these bullets superior stopping power. The main downsides are that the magazine will hold fewer cartridges, the increased recoil can be a problem for less experienced shooters, and ammo is more expensive than for 9mm rounds.

.223 Remington and 5.56×45 mm

.223 Remington (.223) and 5.56x45mm (5.56 NATO) calibers are very similar in size. 5.56 NATO rounds have more pressure than .223, so it is dangerous to fire 5.56 NATO ammo in a .223 rifle. In some cases, you may be able to fire .223 ammo in a 5.56 NATO gun, although you should always check the specific recommendations in your firearm’s owner’s manual. This caliber is common for AR-15-style-rifles and its smaller size results in a light recoil.

.308 Winchester and 7.62x51mm

.308 Winchester (.308) and 7.62x51mm (7.62 NATO) rounds are both rifle rounds and are similar in size. Mixing these requires special knowledge, so it is usually best to stick with the round that is recommended for your specific firearm. These are popular choices for hunting and are used in heavier caliber machine guns.

Questions about Calibers?

If you have questions about different calibers, you can always ask our experts at The Hub. Whether you are a seasoned enthusiast or a first-time buyer, we are happy to help you find exactly what you are looking for.

Visit The Hub today and browse the different calibers of guns and ammo that we offer.

Tips for Safe Concealed Carry

Carrying a concealed weapon can be a great way to protect yourself and your family if the worst-case scenario ever occurred. However, it is also an important responsibility and you should make sure you understand how to stay safe while carrying a firearm. By taking advantage of your right to practice concealed carry, you are accepting the responsibility of acting with the utmost precaution and care. It is important that you ensure the safety of both yourself and those around you.

Here are a few simple tips for safer concealed carry:

Earn Your CCW Permit

Arizona is a constitutional carry state, which means that if you can legally own a gun and meet requirements for age, you can carry your weapon openly or concealed without a concealed carry weapon (CCW) permit. However, the state does issue permits and there are many reasons that you should consider getting your Arizona CCW.

One of these is the additional safety training you get by taking a CCW class. The process of earning your permit teaches you safety tips that you may not have learned otherwise. You will also learn about important state laws and regulations for carrying your firearm. The Hub’s CCW classes fulfill Arizona requirements to earn your permit and your certificate of completion acts as hard-copy proof of your knowledge of gun safety.

Concealed Carry Holster vs. Purse

Your two main choices for concealing your weapon are a holster or a purse. In most cases, we recommend a holster. This will wrap around your body and attach to your clothes, making them the best way to keep your gun on you safely at all times. Their shape is designed to specifically hold firearms while offering the weapon protection against debris. While a purse can be taken from you with your gun inside, it is more difficult for a criminal to gain access to your holster. We discuss this in our Get on Target podcast episode “Top CCW Questions Answered.”

It is essential that you have control of your gun at all times and that you can quickly and easily access it in case of an emergency. The best way to do this with a holster is to have the tip of the gun facing down and concealed inside the pocket of the holster. Many concealed carry holsters will conceal the gun trigger to prevent any unwanted access. When buying a holster, you should consider multiple options to find the best one for your needs. You can browse our selection of gun holsters online or visit us in store.

Don’t Fidget

When carrying a concealed weapon in public, it is best to make sure those around you are not aware of your weapon. By touching and fidgeting with your holster and gun, you are likely to alert strangers to the presence of your firearm. This can make the people around you uncomfortable and nervous. If you are not using your gun, you should keep it concealed and avoid drawing attention to it.

The Benefits of Concealed Carry

Carrying a concealed weapon can bring you a better sense of confidence in being able to protect yourself in a dangerous situation. However, you will be more successful in guaranteeing your safety and protecting those around you if you practice these safety tips.

CCW Classes and Holsters at The Hub

The Hub is your one-stop shop for guns, safety training, and firearm accessories. We offer Arizona CCW classes and a large selection of holsters so you can safely conceal your firearm.

Contact us today to learn more about how we can help you earn a concealed carry permit or properly secure your concealed firearm.

What Does a CCW Class Cover?

Although Arizona does not require a permit to conceal carry a weapon, taking a concealed carry weapon (CCW) class and earning your permit can be very beneficial. Earning your permit gives you reciprocity in other states and may allow you to carry your weapon in more locations. In addition, these classes teach you important legal and safety information that can help you be more prepared if you need to use your gun for self-defense.

Our CCW class covers the following:

Arizona CCW Requirements

In order to earn an Arizona CCW permit, you must meet certain requirements:

  • Be a legal resident of Arizona or a US Citizen
  • Be over 21 years old or over 19 years old with proof of military service
  • Have no felony convictions or indictments
  • Have no mental illness causing you to be institutionalized or deemed mentally incompetent by the state

In addition, Arizona Revised Statutes (ARS) 13-3112 requires CCW permit holders to demonstrate competence with a firearm. In most cases, the best way to prove this is by completing a permit class. Our CCW class at The Hub covers all the information necessary for you to earn your permit. At the end of the class, we will help you fill out and send all the forms necessary to get your CCW.

Gun Safety

One of the most important topics we cover in our CCW class is gun safety. As a responsible gun owner, there are certain guidelines you should follow to keep yourself and your family as safe as possible. Our classes cover safe handling, care, and storage for your firearms.

Legal Concerns

Understanding Arizona’s laws regarding concealed carry, self-defense, and gun ownership is important to help you avoid legal issues. Not knowing the current laws in place can put everyone’s safety at risk and you could lose your right to own a gun if you are convicted of a felony. During our CCW class, we will go over some of the most important legal topics related to concealed carry. This includes where you can and cannot carry your weapon, when you should inform law enforcement officers about a concealed weapon, and what the definition of self-defense includes.

Hands-On Practice

Our CCW classes are designed to not only give you valuable information in a classroom setting but to also give you hands-on practice using a firearm for self-defense.

Lakeside: Shooting Range

At our Lakeside location, our CCW class includes live fire at our indoor shooting range. This allows you to practice handling and firing your weapon under the guidance of a professional. Practicing in this setting helps you to better understand how you can use your firearm for self-defense and allows you to ask any questions you have about operating your weapon.

We require that anyone taking our CCW class possess basic firearm skills including loading and unloading. If you are a complete beginner, we offer 101 training courses.

Tucson: MILO Range

Our Tucson gun store has a state-of-the-art MILO Range. This is a virtual reality system that allows you to use laser pistols to act out real-life self-defense situations. Our Enhanced CCW “+” Class includes time on our MILO Range under the supervision of our highly-skilled instructors.

CCW Classes at The Hub

If you are interested in our CCW classes, contact us today to learn more.